LEGO book review: The Fault in our Stars

From  the archive: 5 June 2014

photo111

I read The Fault in Our Stars over Christmas (it was a gift to myself). In fact, I very rudely sat outside in the sun, while my partner and his family were inside in the middle of Christmas lunch celebrations. I couldn’t put the book down, not even on Christmas Day.

(See this picture? That’s me stretched out between two camping chairs while trifle is being served inside.)

Continue reading “LEGO book review: The Fault in our Stars”

LEGO book review: The Roanoke Girls

image

I know a few people who make a habit of not reading Next Big Thing books because ultimately, the end result never quite lives up to the hype. (I haven’t read The Girl on the Train and the movie’s already gone to DVD).

But sometimes it does.

Continue reading “LEGO book review: The Roanoke Girls”

LEGO book review: Closed Casket

y450-2931

I’m not quite sure why I love Agatha Christie mysteries so much. Nostalgia. The challenge of trying to figure out who did it. I read them again and again, especially around this time of year. And each re-read is as satisfying as the first time round.

Continue reading “LEGO book review: Closed Casket”

LEGO book review: The Gospel of Loki

gospel-of-loki

Myths are awesome. They’re the world’s first stories. Most people are familiar with the big Greek myths, like the heroic tale of Perseus, who chopped off Medusa’s head, or Hercules’ incredible twelve tasks, or even Jason’s search for the Golden Fleece. Works like The Iliad and The Odyssey ensured that these stories have lived on for centuries. Hollywood has been dipping its pen into the ancient myth pool for years. Thanks to Disney, most kids grow up knowing all about Hercules and his satyr side-kick, Phil. (Are you turning in your grave yet, Homer?)

Continue reading “LEGO book review: The Gospel of Loki”

LEGO book review: Glaze

GLAZE_New_Finalsm
I love are books that challenge readers to think for themselves. Think Suzanne Collin’s The Hunger Games, Veronica Roth’s Divergent and Cory Doctorow’s Little Brother – books that make the reader believe that they have a voice, a future and inner strength capable of facing any enemy. Glaze is a smart, slick book that does just that.

Continue reading “LEGO book review: Glaze”